12 November 2017

Kohen Hands and the Letters Peh Nun (פנ) in a Jewish Cemetery

100_0777To put it simply (and this may even be an oversimplification) a set of hands carved and placed over a tombstone in a Jewish cemetery are called Kohen (or Kohain, or Kohanim) hands, and represent a priestly blessing.

The staff at MyJewishLearning.com explain that a kohen "is a descendant of the sons of Aaron who served as priests in the Temple in Jerusalem."

Lorne Rozovsky at Chabad.org delves further:

According to the Torah, Jacob had twelve sons. Each son was the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Each tribe had a separate territory, with the exception of the tribe of Levi.

During the Exodus, when the Israelites made the Golden Calf, only the Levites refused to worship it. As a result, they were appointed servants to G‑d. Of the members of this tribe, those who were descended from Aaron, brother of Moses, became the kohanim. Aaron was the first kohen, and also the first high priest.

The priestly blessing is a ceremonial prayer recited by the kohanim, wherein their hands are formed in the fashion seen in the image at right.  Words of the prayer are found in the Biblical text of Numbers 6:23-27, and read as follows:

May the Lord bless thee and keep thee;
May the Lord make His face to shine upon thee, and be gracious unto thee;
May the Lord life up His countenance upon thee, and give thee peace.

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About the Hebrew Letters Peh Nun (פנ)

The Hebrew letters Peh Nun (פנ) – as seen under the Star of David in the image immediately below – are often found at the beginning of any engraved script on a tombstone in a Jewish cemetery.  These letters are an acronym for the phrase Po Nikbar or Po Nitman, and translates to "Here Lies."

star-herelies

menorah




10 November 2017

Requiem Aeternam Dona Eis (Even More Latin in the Cemetery)

Image taken April 2011 at Rose Hill Cemetery in Macon, Bibb County, Georgia.

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Joseph Paul Powell, III (1959-2010)

Mr. Powell, son of Christine Harkness Powell, was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution and the Sons of Confederate Veterans.  Two lines on his granite ledger marker are in Latin:

Requiem Aeternam Dona Eis.
Domine: Et Lux Perpetua Luceat Eis.

This prayer for the dead translates to English as follows:

Grant Them Eternal Rest, O Lord.
And Let The Light Shine Upon Them.



requiemaeternamdonaeis

02 May 2017

Our Soldier Boy, David G. Slappey (Tombstone Tuesday)

The remains of David G. Slappey rest at the Marshallville City Cemetery in Macon County, Georgia.  D. G. died at Portsmouth, Virginia in 1862 or 1863, in the service to his country.

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Our Soldier Boy

David G. Slappey
Died in Portsmouth, Va
April 30, 1862
In his 19th Year

He died a Martyr to his COUNTRY.

Twas hard to bid a long adieu,
To one we loved so well;
Ah hard to say that bitter word,
That bitter word farewell.

Amiable and beloved son, farewell!
Thy years were few, but thy virtues
were many; they are recorded not
on this perishing stone,
but in the Book of Life, and in the
hearts of thy afflicted Parents, and FRIENDS.

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29 April 2017

Y is for the Youngest Mayor of Rome, GA: Benjamin Yancey (A to Z)

Benjamin Cudworth Yancey was born 16 January 1877/8 in Rome, Floyd County, Georgia.  He was a son of Hamilton Yancey of Edgefield District, South Carolina and Florence Patterson of Fort Valley, Georgia.  Ben was also a "grandson of Colonel Benjamin C. Yancey, once minister to Brazil, and grand-nephew of the south's celebrated orator and statesman, William L. Yancey, of Alabama."

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Ben C. Yancey received a law degree from the University of Georgia, but was engaged in the insurance business prior to becoming Rome's city recorder.  He held the latter position for two years before becoming Mayor in 1912.  Following from the Dalton Citizen (Georgia):

It is with pleasure that we note that our good friend, Benjamin C. Yancey, has been elected mayor of Rome.  Mr. Yancey is only thirty-three years old, being the youngest mayor Rome ever had.  Ben will make good as mayor of Rome just as he made good as city recorder.  The Citizen congratulates both the city of Rome and Mayor Yancey.

Ben died at his home in Rome, at the young age of just 51 years, due to angina pectoris.  He left a wife and at least one son.

Ben's wife was Maud Harris.  She was a daughter of Hamilton Harris of Cartersville, Bartow County, Georgia and Ethel Hillyer.  Ethel was a daughter of Dr. Eben Hillyer, the subject of an earlier post.

Lobar Pneumonia took Maud, born 1885, nine years after Ben's death.  In between Ben's death and her own, Maud was married to Mr. C. H. Porter.

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What remains of Ben and Maud rests at Myrtle Hill Cemetery in Rome, Georgia.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

27 April 2017

W is for Warren Grice, Jr. Oh, Those Toes! (A to Z, It's Sort of Personal)

100_5724Warren, Jr. was the son of Warren Grice and Clara E. Rumph.  Remains of the little one rest at Marshallville Cemetery in Macon County, Georgia.

Macon Telegraph (Georgia)
Sunday, 22 July 1906 - pg. 1 [via GenealogyBank]

WARREN GRICE, JR., 3 YEARS OLD DIES

MARSHALLVILLE, Ga., July 21. -- Warren, the 3-year-old son of Col. and Mrs. Warren Grice, of Hawkinsville, died here while on a visit to his grandfather, Mr. S. H. Rumph, and was buried in the cemetery here today. The parents have the sympathy of their numerous friends here and in Hawkinsville.

(You might remember, Mr. Samuel H. Rumph was mentioned earlier on this blog – for the letter O, as the Originator of the Georgia Peach Industry.)

I don't know who the carver was of this memorial placed for little Warren, but the detail is pretty amazing.  Just look at those toes!

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Resting near Warren the younger is Warren the elder.  This Mr. Grice, a judge, was the son of Washington Leonidas Grice and Martha V. Warren.

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"He that loveth his brother abideth in the light."

Though not directly related, I do have a connection to the Warrens Grice:  Senior is 1st cousin 1x removed of the husband (Silas D. P. Scarborough) of the sister-in-law (Martha C. Jackson) of my 2nd great grand uncle (William Henry Peavy).  Junior, of course, is 1st cousin twice removed…

Don't you love those genealogy rabbit holes?


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

26 April 2017

V is for Veiled in Mystery: James Mooney Killed in the Line of Duty (A-Z)

Someone got away with murder.

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Rome Tri-Weekly Courier (Georgia)
21 April 1874 -- pg. 3

THE BLUDGEON.

THE MYSTERIOUS KILLING OF POLICEMAN MOONEY.

…Rome has been thrown into much excitement in consequence of the mysterious taking off of Policeman Mooney, an officer of quiet and orderly habits, faithful in the discharge of his duties, and known as a reliable man and a good citizen.  The circumstances of his death are still veiled in mystery, the Coroner's inquest having developed no clue as to how and by whom the deceased came to his death.  It seems to be one of those well-laid plans of crime which leave no trace of the perpetrator or perpetrators.  So far the Coroner and his jury have been unable to unravel the mystery or to get on track of any information that promises to lead to the development of the crime.

Mooney's body was discovered late one Saturday night "along the track of the Rome Railroad, at the foot of Etowah street, almost directly upon the bank of the Etowah river, and but a short distance from the site of the steam mills of C. E. Hills & Co., recently burned."

CHARACTER OF THE WOUNDS.
Upon investigation it was discovered that the deceased had received a heavy blow behind the left ear, crushing the skull, and another across the left side of the head above the the [sic] ear, and rather to the posterior of the head. Both of these blows seemed to have been inflicted with a club, or a heavy, blunt instrument in the shape of a bludgeon, and either one were calculated to produce death...

It seems to have been a surprise attack, as there were no signs of a struggle.  The Coroner's Inquest, held "the whole of Sunday," found nothing that pointed "to the party who committed the deed."

WIFE AND CHILD BEREAVED.
Policeman Mooney leaves a wife and child who were entirely dependent on him for support…

The mayor of the city offered a $250 reward for information leading to the arrest of the murderer or murderers of Policeman Mooney, but the Coroner and his jury remained clueless.

Less than two months later, James Peter Mooney's whistle was found.  Following also from the Rome Tri-Weekly Courier, dated 9 June 1874:

We understand that the parties engaged in putting up the new telegraph poles through the city, found Policeman Mooney's whistle at or near the junction of the railroads in the upper part of the city.  The question is, Died he lose it there in the struggle for life, or did the murderers throw it away or lose it in that part of the city after committing the deed?

More than another month goes by, and still nothing.  The last I found from 1874 follows.

Rome Tri-Weekly Courier (Georgia)
14 July 1874 -- pg. 3

FLOYD SUPERIOR COURT.

The Grand Jury Presentments for the First Week.

We have instituted as rigid and thorough an investigation as it was in our power to do, in relation to the brutal assassination of Policeman Mooney in the city of Rome in April last; but after an exhaustive effort on our part we regret to say that our labors, like those of the Coroner's Jury, to discover the fiendish perpetrators of the diabolical outrage have been unsuccessful.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

25 April 2017

Under the Urn Rest the Shorters (A to Z Challenge, Tombstone Tuesday)

The remains of Alfred and Martha B. Shorter rest at Myrtle Hill Cemetery in Rome, Floyd County, Georgia under a remarkably clean tombstone topped with a draped urn.  Martha was born 25 January 1799, and died 22 March 1877.  When her funeral services were conducted at the Baptist Church, it was said by the Rome Weekly Courier to be the largest congregation "ever known to have assembled on a week day."

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Alfred, born 23 November 1803, lived five more years without Martha.  His obituary ran in the 20 July 1882 Cedartown Advertiser:

Death of Col. Shorter of Rome.
On Tuesday at 2 P. M. Col. Alfred Shorter in his 79th year died at his home surrounded by his friends and kindred.  For more than a year his physical strength has been failing and by degrees death took possession of his frame, the vital flame burned itself away and his noble form was left cold and pulseless.  His biography would be the history of Rome, for forty years he has lived among his people, been identified with her interests, took part in the great transactions that concerned the welfare of the community and by his kindness, honesty and energy endeared himself to all her people.  He became immensely rich.  He used his money for the public good.  The Shorter College which he has just completed will stand as a monument to his memory to all coming generations.

shorterurn

Alfred Shorter continued to give to the Shorter College even after his death.  His will was printed in the local newspaper.  It provided -

To Shorter College, $23,000 Rome water-works bonds; $7,000 Rome bonds; 100 shares Rome railroad stock.  And it is my will that the corpus of said property as above mentioned be regarded as sacred and for ever be set apart as a permanent endowment of said college, the interest or income from said bonds or stock to be used in the employment of teachers, in reduction of tuition, in giving assistance to poor but worthy students, keeping up repairs or in any other way the trustees in their judgement think will best advance the interest of said college.

To Shorter College $5,000 for additional apparatus, furniture and improvement of grounds, under direction of the president.

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Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

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