25 April 2017

Under the Urn Rest the Shorters (A to Z Challenge, Tombstone Tuesday)

The remains of Alfred and Martha B. Shorter rest at Myrtle Hill Cemetery in Rome, Floyd County, Georgia under a remarkably clean tombstone topped with a draped urn.  Martha was born 25 January 1799, and died 22 March 1877.  When her funeral services were conducted at the Baptist Church, it was said by the Rome Weekly Courier to be the largest congregation "ever known to have assembled on a week day."

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Alfred, born 23 November 1803, lived five more years without Martha.  His obituary ran in the 20 July 1882 Cedartown Advertiser:

Death of Col. Shorter of Rome.
On Tuesday at 2 P. M. Col. Alfred Shorter in his 79th year died at his home surrounded by his friends and kindred.  For more than a year his physical strength has been failing and by degrees death took possession of his frame, the vital flame burned itself away and his noble form was left cold and pulseless.  His biography would be the history of Rome, for forty years he has lived among his people, been identified with her interests, took part in the great transactions that concerned the welfare of the community and by his kindness, honesty and energy endeared himself to all her people.  He became immensely rich.  He used his money for the public good.  The Shorter College which he has just completed will stand as a monument to his memory to all coming generations.

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Alfred Shorter continued to give to the Shorter College even after his death.  His will was printed in the local newspaper.  It provided -

To Shorter College, $23,000 Rome water-works bonds; $7,000 Rome bonds; 100 shares Rome railroad stock.  And it is my will that the corpus of said property as above mentioned be regarded as sacred and for ever be set apart as a permanent endowment of said college, the interest or income from said bonds or stock to be used in the employment of teachers, in reduction of tuition, in giving assistance to poor but worthy students, keeping up repairs or in any other way the trustees in their judgement think will best advance the interest of said college.

To Shorter College $5,000 for additional apparatus, furniture and improvement of grounds, under direction of the president.

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Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

24 April 2017

T is for Thomas James Berry, a Soldier & a Man (A to Z Challenge)

Standing proud and tall, with a laurel wreath – a symbol of victory over death – draped over it's top, is a monument to the career soldier Thomas James Berry.  The four sides and panels tell the story of his supreme sacrifice in body and a life cut short.

Girls Day Oct 2014-003

In Memory of
Thomas James Berry
Born October 28, 1835
Who Died At Newnan, The Place Of His Birth, The 16th Day Of October A.D. 1865.

A Graduate Of The United States Military Academy At West Point, N.Y. Class Of 1857.
He Served As Lieutenant Of Dragoons In The U.S. Army Till 1861.
A Soldier In The Southern Army He Was Wounded In Seven Battles.

No Country E'er Had A Truer Son --
No Cause A Nobler Champion;
No People A Braver Defender,
Than The Dead Soldier Who Sleeps Here!

A Man Tried,
In Many High Offices And Critical Enterprises;
And Found Faithful In All.
In His Honor Impregnable;
In His Simplicity Sublime.

An Obituary from 21 October 1865 edition of Newnan Herald (Georgia):

DIED,

At the family residence in this place, on Monday, the 16th inst., Colonel THOMAS J. BERRY, in the 30th year of his age, son of Hon. A. J. Berry, and late of the 60th Regt. Ga. Vols., Army of Virginia.

Col. Berry graduated at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, in the Class of 1857, was commissioned Lieutenant in the 2d Dragoons, U.S. Army, with which he served in the Utah campaign, and against the Indians in Oregon and California till the secession of Georgia, January 19th, 1861, when he resigned his commission in the Federal Army and tendered his services in defence of his native South.

Ever at his post, from the siege of Fort Pickens to the close of the war, he participated in the severe battles in front of Richmond, at the second Manassa [sic], and in the Valley, receiving five wounds, by which his manly form was exhausted.

He will be remembered long by his numerous friends and acquaintances as a genial companion, a talented scholar, a courteous and polite gentleman, and by the gallant veterans of the Virginia Army as a brave and true soldier.

The remains of Thomas James Berry rest at Oak Hill Cemetery at Newnan, Coweta County, Georgia.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

22 April 2017

S is for the State Seal of Georgia on Tom Owen's Tombstone (A to Z)

An arch which bears the word Constitution is over three pillars, representing the three branches of government, on the State Seal of Georgia.  Banners around each pillar contain the words Wisdom, Justice, and Moderation – Georgia's official motto.  Here is the simplified version of this seal on Captain Tom Owen's tombstone.

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Capt. Tom Musgrove Owen was born in Coweta County, Georgia 10 October 1834.  He enlisted in the 4th Texas Regiment, C.S.A. 7 May 1861 at Grimes County, Texas.  His service proved fatal when little over a year later the captain received a gunshot wound in the Battle of Gaines Mill (noted as "farm" on his tombstone) near Richmond, Virginia.  Capt. Owen died as a result 3 August 1862 at Richmond.

100_5635The following is from Sid Johnson's Texans Who Wore the Gray as transcribed and shared by James Douglas here:

Just before we were ordered into line of battle, and while heavy firing could be heard in our front and on each flank, Captain Owens of our regiment, was talking to some comrades of the battle in which we expected soon to be engaged, and drawing his sword and waiving it over his head, repeated the following lines from Scott's "Marmion" [an epic poem about the 1513 Battle of Flodden]:

The war that for a space did fail
Now, trebly thundering, swelled the gale,
And "Stanley!" was the cry;
A light on Marmion's visage spread
And fired his glazing eye;
With dying hand above his head,
He shook the fragment of his blade
And shouted "Victory!"
"Charge, Chester, charge! On, Stanley, on!"
Were the last words of Marmion.

While they were the last words of Marmion, they were almost the last words of Gallant Owens, who fell mortally wounded in less than half an hour from the time he quoted them with such prophetic inspiration.

On the back of Capt. Owen's tombstone at Oak Hill Cemetery in Newnan, Georgia is an intricate carving of two crossed swords:

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A signature of the stone carver is located on the bottom right corner of the stone.  Michael Muldoon of M. Muldoon & Co. was a reputable and talented carver.  This stone was possibly made out of Italian marble, as I believe was often Mr. Muldoon's base before sculpture.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

21 April 2017

R is for Resting in Hope of a Glorious Resurrection (A to Z Challenge)

Husband and wife (and father and mother) Shadrach Ware and Clarissa Shine rest together at Marshallville City Cemetery in Macon County, Georgia.

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Father and Mother

Shadrach Ware
Feb 17, 1808
Sept 1, 1873

Clarissa
Wife of S. Ware
Feb 18, 1820
Aug 3, 1880

Resting in Hope of a Glorious Resurrection

Something extra-special about the Ware's elaborate tombstone is all the symbolism. Sitting on top is a floriated cross and anchor.  A floriated cross bears arms with three "projections" on the ends, representing the Trinity.  The anchor is a symbol of hope.

cross-anchor

Next is wheat.  It could represent a long and fruitful life, as well as immortality and resurrection.  Wheat is also a popular Masonic symbol.

wheat

Lastly, we have an urn and flame.  This could represent eternal life of the soul.

urn-flame

Other symbols on the stone (not pictured) include a fern and lily.  The fern represents humility and sincerity.  The lily represents purity, and the casting off of earthly things.

This is a wonderfully intricate stone that gives the passer-by a lot to ponder.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

20 April 2017

Q is for the Quigg Family & a Son's Supreme Sacrifice (A to Z Challenge)

What else could I do for the letter Q, but introduce you to the Quigg family.  Three members rest at Myrtle Hill Cemetery in Rome, Floyd County, Georgia – father, mother, and son.

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I like the sentiment here – Ever she looked for good, ever she found it.

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Always Faithful, Mr. Quigg.  I thank you for your service.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

19 April 2017

P is for the Prominent Minister of Newnan Who Passed Away: J. H. Hall

100_5599Rev. James Hamilton Hall, a Doctor of Divinity, was born 16 April 1836 in Greenville, Meriwether County, Georgia to Alexander and Elizabeth "Betsy" Brown Hall.  James's grandfather was the Irish born Hugh Hall.

Alexander was in a position of "financial ease," and thus provided his son James with the "best educational advantages." Yet in a biography of the good reverend, published 1912 in Men of Mark in Georgia, it was written that James led "an aimless and dissipated life."

The young man arrived at manhood and became, through a certain philosophic trend of mind, imbedded in the meshes of unbelief.  He even went so far as for a time to lead an aimless and dissipated life.  He had one strong anchor in the shape of the young lady to whom he was engaged, Miss Sarah E. Hall, of Greene county.  She was a woman of strong Christian character, and while she positively refused to marry him during this period of his life, she yet did not let him entirely go, and her influence, combined with that of other friends finally induced in him a season of serious thought.

Eventually, young James "threw off the shackles of unbelief and took up the cross of Christian duty." He got the girl, too.  Sarah became Mrs. J. H. Hall about November 1859.  The biographer continues:

In May, 1860, he was baptized into the Bethlehem Church, of Coweta county.  In August, 1861, he was ordained to the Baptist ministry at the meeting of the Western Association.  His first work was as pastor of the church at Franklin, Heard county.  Later he served the Providence, Mt. Lebanon, and Greenville churches in Meriwether county.  From these he came back to his home county and ministered to Bethlehem, Mt. Labanon and White Oak Grove churches in Coweta county and Bethel church in Heard county.  From the pastorate of these he was called in 1869 to the Newnan church, where he concluded his life service in a pastorate of over thirty years.

Rev. Hall and Sarah had eight children.  Only four survived him.  One of them, a son named Hewlett, was also well known in Newnan and throughout Georgia.

James Hamilton Hall died in Newnan 18 July 1903, "after more than forty years of untiring labor in the cause of the Master." From the 19 July 1903 edition of the Columbus Daily Enquirer (Georgia), via GenealogyBank:

REV. J. H. HALL DEAD.

Prominent Minister of Newnan Passes Away.
Newnan, Ga, July 18. – Rev. James H. Hall, D. D., pastor of the Central Baptist church of this city, and one of the most profound pulpit orators of the State, died this morning at 2 o'clock after a very short illness.

Only last week he was active in revival at his church, during which he was taken with dysentery, the attack of which physicians could not stay.  He was born in 1837 [sic], and began active ministry in 1860, and in 1870 was called to the church at this place, which he actively and incessantly served.  Possibly no man in the country was more universally loved and whose death will be more deplored.

He leaves and wife and several children, among whom is Hon. Hewitt [sic] A. Hall.

The funeral will be conducted by Rev. Vaughn, of LaGrange, and Rev. V. A. Ham, of this city, tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock, from the Central Baptist church.

The remains of Rev. James Hamilton Hall rest in the family burial lot at Oak Hill Cemetery in Newnan.

"I shall be satisfied when I awake in thy likeness."


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

18 April 2017

O is for the Originator of the Georgia Peach Industry, Samuel Rumph (A-Z)

Question:  "What's the top fruit crop in the state of Georgia?"

Answer:  "Blueberries."

Is that not what you were expecting? It's really a relatively recent development.  In the last dozen years, blueberries have bested peaches as the top fruit crop in Georgia.  But that in no way diminishes the impact the humble peach had (and still has) on this state.

100_5719Georgia earned it's "Peach State" nickname in the decades following the Civil War, when annual production expanded to reach a height of about 8 million bushels by 1928.  One of the people we have to thank for that is Samuel Rumph:

Samuel Henry Rumph, a middle Georgia peach grower during the late 1800’s, is credited with being the “Father of the Georgia Peach industry” as he revolutionized the industry with a new variety which he named after his wife Elberta. This yellow-fleshed peach was of superior quality and shipped better than previous varieties. Not only did he breed this superior variety but he also invented a way to ice train cars loaded with peaches, thus getting this "Queen of Fruits" into the populous Northeast.  Rumph never patented his Elberta peach or the refrigerated train car. Instead he opted to share this windfall with his neighbors and the "Georgia Peach Boom" began. – Georgia Peach Council

Mr. Rumph died 22 December 1922, and as you might imagine, papers across the state of Georgia carried the news.  Here is one such article from the Columbus Ledger, dated the day of Samuel's death [via GenealogyBank]:

Originator of Georgia Peach Industry Dead
Marshallville, Ga., Dec. 22. – Samuel H. Rumph, 70, known in this section as the father and originator of the peach industry, died at 3 o'clock this morning at his home here.

Mr. Rumph suffered a stroke early yesterday and members of his family were summoned to his bedside.

He was the propagator of the famous Elberta and George Belle peaches.  The Elberta was named after his first wife.  Mr. Rumph was the first man to ship a crate of peaches out of Georgia.

Practically all of Mr. Rumph's life was devoted to agriculture.  When he first grew peaches for commercial purposes and announced that he intended to ship peaches out of the state, he received little encouragement and many who heard of his pro[s]pect regarded it with skepticism.

From the shipping of the first crate of peaches by Mr. Rumph the fruit industry began to grow and today in middle Georgia is second to cotton in importance.

Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at 10:30 at Marshallville.

The remains of Samuel Henry Rumph rest at Marshallville Cemetery in Macon County, Georgia.  His fine tombstone is located between those of two important women in his life:  his mother Caroline, and his first wife Clara Elberta.

Marshallville Cemetery - Fair Harbor


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

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