29 January 2014

New Photo for an Old Obituary

About 6 1/2 years ago (yikes!), I posted an old obituary published for the death of Maria Longstreet, the first wife of famed Confederate General James Longstreet. In October last, I had the opportunity to stand where mourners stood more than 120 years ago to say their final goodbyes to the "distinguished Georgia lady." Now I can offer a photo with the obituary.

Atlanta Constitution (Georgia)
31 December 1889, pg. 1
Digital image here via Newspapers.com.

Mrs. Longstreet Dead
A Distinguished Georgia Lady Passes Away

Gainesville, GA, December 30 -- Special -- The queen city of the mountains mourns over the death of Mrs. Maria Louise Longstreet, consort of General James Longstreet, who passed peacefully away last evening at nine o'clock, at the Piedmont hotel, in this city, surrounded by her husband and her loving children.

Mrs. Longstreet has been confined to her room several months and bore her suffering patiently and with Christian resignation. She was a lady of rare and varied accomplishments, and in her death Gainesville loses a bright ornament in society. Her maiden name was Garland, a daughter of General John Garland, of the United States army, and a distinguished citizen of Virginia. She was born on the 16th day of March, 1827, at Fort Snelling, Minn., and was married to General Longstreet in Lynchburg, VA, on March 8th, 1848. She accompanied the general while engaged in the Mexican war. She was not unaccustomed to rumors of war or the din and smoke of battle for she was near to the general while his sword gleamed for four long years in defense of his country during the civil war. Prior to this time she was on the frontier with her husband, where he was engaged fighting Indians. She leaves five children - four sons, John Garland, Robert Lee, James and Randolph, and one daughter, Lula. Alta Vista cemetery will be her last resting place, where her remains will be interred tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock.

Maria Louisa Garland
Wife of James Longstreet
1827 - 1889
A Dutiful Wife
And A Fond Mother

28 January 2014

Great Warrior Laid in Grave at Alta Vista (Tombstone Tuesday)

James Longstreet, In The Military Service Of The United
States 1838 To 1861, Brigadier General Confederate States
Army June 1861, Promoted Major General May 1862,
Promoted Lieutenant General September 1862,
Commanding First Corps Army Of Northern Virginia To
April 9, 1865.
"GEN. JAMES LONGSTREET ENDS LIFE'S BATTLE

SUCCUMBED AT HOME OF HIS DAUGHTER IN GAINESVILLE -- DEATH WAS SUDDEN AND CREATED MUCH SURPRISE -- LOST BLOOD GUSHED FROM WOUND INFLICTED BY HIS OWN MEN AT THE BATTLE OF THE WILDERNESS -- HE WAS UNITED STATES RAILWAY COMMISSIONER AND ONE OF THE GREATEST CONFEDERATE GENERALS OF THE CIVIL WAR.


GAINESVILLE, Ga., Jan. 4 -- Gen. James Longstreet, hero of the Mexican war, the last of ranking lieutenant-generals of the Confederacy, United States railway commissioner, author, politician and statesman, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. Estin Whelchel, College avenue, this city, at 5 o'clock this afternoon, of pneumonia. His death was sudden and created the greatest surprise to his family and friends. His wife, his daughter, his sons, John G. and F. Randolph Longstreet, were at his bedside when death ensued. He had a hemorrhage, fell back upon his bed, lapsed into unconsciousness and died in a few moments. Through his mouth and the old wound in his throat, received by him at the battle of the Wilderness, through mistake of his own men, blood rushed, and medical aid could avail nothing. The pallor of death encircling his features, the greatest warrior of modern times passed away..."


"...Gen. Longstreet was twice married, his first wife being a daughter of the late Gen. John Garland, U.S.A., five children being issued, viz., John G. of Atlanta, R. Lee of Washington, D.C., James, captain in the Thirteenth cavalry, U.S.A., now in the Philippines, F. Randolph of this city and Mrs. J. E. Whelchel.  His first wife died fifteen years ago.  In 1897 he was again married to Miss Ellen Dortch of Carnesville, former assistant state librarian..."


"...the funeral and interment will occur here, the body being laid to rest by the side of his wife in the family lot in Alta Vista cemetery."

How Sleep The Brave
Who Sink To Rest
By All Their Country's
Wishes Blest.


[Note: Quoted portions above from article in Macon Telegraph (Georgia), 3 January 1904, pg. 1. Viewed online at GenealogyBank.]

21 January 2014

Austin Hammett, His Likeness in Stone (Tombstone Tuesday)

Austin
Son of W. D. & Jessie Hammett
b. Oct 17, 1912
d. Nov 3, 1918




Alta Vista Cemetery
Gainesville, Hall County, Georgia

All Photos © 2013-2014 S. Lincecum

14 January 2014

William Clark and Beal Baker -- a Revolutionary Tombstone Tuesday

William Clark
Pvt Price's Co
Sevier's N.C. Regt
Rev War
July 2, 1843
Resting at Alta Vista Cemetery in Gainesville, Hall County, Georgia, are two Revolutionary War soldiers, William Clark and Beal Baker. I was able to find an obituary for William Clark, though it's missing some letters / words due to a bend in the scanned image. All the bracketed information makes for choppy reading, but I thought I'd post it anyway in case someone's research might benefit from it.

Augusta Chronicle (Georgia)
14 July 1843, pg. 3
OBITUARY.
[AN]OTHER REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIER HAS LEFT US.

WILLIAM CLARK departed this life, in Hall [cou]nty, on the 4th day of June, 1843. He was [bor]n in North Carolina, on the 7th of April, 1757, [and?] was consequently at the time of his death in [?]. Before he was grown his father [m]oved to the Nolychuchy River, now in East [Tenne]ssee, where he resided during the Revolutionary war. In that momentous struggle, Mr. [Clar]k served three campaigns under General [Price?] in South Carolina, and was engaged in [sev]eral excursions against the Cherokee Indians, [under?] Col. Sevier, of Tennessee. He was pre[sent?] a young man grown, at the treaty where [Daniel?] Boon purchased the territory of Kentucky. [In 1782?], he married the daughter of ex-Governor [Sev]ier and at the close of the war removed and [settl]ed on Tugalo river, at the place known as [?]'s Ford, of Jarrat's Bridge, on the South [Car]olina side, where he raised fifty-two crops.

In the 80th year of his age, on account of his [?]ing infirmities, he disposed of his possessions at that place, and divided his property a[?] his descendants, reserving something [?] a child's part, and removed to Hall county, [to be] near to his two youngest children, where he [died.]

[?] Clark lived to see the fourth generation, and [acc?]ording to the best estimate, there are not less [tha]n 150 of his descendants scattered over the [sta]tes of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Texas. But the patriarch [?]. He has passed that bourne from [?] no traveller returns. Who of his offspring [?], by imitating his sterling honesty and in[dependence?] -- his indomitable industry and ener[getic?] character, will secure like success in life, [?] respect when dead?
You can see the death date on the military headstone is inconsistent with the death date in the obituary. Also, a (second?) wife of William's is buried nearby: Ruth Goodwin, born 14 May 1767.


And here is a photo of Beal Baker's military headstone.

Beal Baker
Pvt Armstrong's Co
Malmedy's N.C. Regt
Rev War
August 31, 1842
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