Skip to main content

Metta Cubbedge: and Rose Hill Has Another Fair Sleeper Awaiting the End of All Things

[Sometimes I publish a post at the Rose Hill Cemetery blog I think Southern Graves readers will enjoy. This is one of those.]

Original photo by James Allen.
Slightly enhanced image above by Stephanie Lincecum.
Metta Cubbedge was born 26 April 1861 in Georgia to Richard W. and Anna M. Cubbedge. The beginning of 1877 saw Metta as a bright scholar of the junior class at Macon, Georgia's Wesleyan College. She was described, in reference to her role as a student, as "faithful to every duty, never by word or action, disobeying her preceptors."

Metta also had an active extracurricular life. She was President of a secret literary society (it was only allowed to maintain a member number of 30) at Wesleyan known as the Philomathean* Society. She also seemed to enjoy singing. Newspaper articles included her name when describing performances by Macon's Baptist Church choir, as well as Wesleyan's Philomathean Society. Miss Metta Cubbedge was often singled out as a soloist. She was described as having a "sweet modest voice." And her rendition of a song called "The Old Arm Chair" was noted as having a "tender pathos and sweet, sad music."

But before the summer of 1877 ended, Metta was dead. The young 16 year old was struck down by typhoid fever. An illness that lasted a mere 10 days.

Before I share a couple of articles about Metta's death and funeral, I'd like to pose a question: Was Metta's death forseshadowed? If I read an article about her funeral correctly (it's transcribed below), a "dying companion" told Metta she would either die young, die soon, or something of the sort. Please comment with any thoughts you might have on this, especially if you think I'm way off base.

Macon Telegraph (Georgia)
1 September 1877, pg. 4
Death of Miss Metta Cubbedge.
The sad intelligence of the death of this young lady reached the city yesterday and threw over her large circle of friends and acquaintances a profound feeling of sadness.

She is a daughter of Mr. R. W. Cubbedge, a prominent banker of this city, and had been spending the summer at Griffin, Georgia, with friends, where she had won by her gentle deportment a host of ardent admirers.

About ten days ago she was taken ill with fever, which rapidly developed into typhoid, and ended her young life yesterday at ten and a half o'clock.

A telegram Friday evening announcing that all the symptoms of the disease were better, deterred Mr. Cubbedge from going up with his family physician, Dr. Boone. Another yesterday morning brough[t] the sad intelligence that she was sinking, and in a few hours after she died.

The remains were brought down on the Central railroad yesterday evening and the funeral will take place from Mr. Cubbedge's residence, on College street, this morning.

All who knew Miss Metta Cubbedge loved her for her many traits of character. She was a member of the junior class at the Wesleyan College this past year and all her companions were devotedly attached to her. Her rendition of the "old arm chair" will never be forgotten by those who heard it for its tender pathos and sweet, sad music. She was just verging into womanhood, but the fair flower has been rudely broken by the hand of death. We tender our sincerest sympathies to the bereaved parents in this sad hour of their mysterious affliction.
Macon Telegraph (Georgia)
2 September 1877, pg. 4
Funeral of Miss Metta Cubbedge.
...The badges of the members of the Philomathean Society, of which she was President, were draped with mourning...

The services were conducted at the grave, and Rose Hill had another fair sleeper awaiting the end of all things. A strange presentiment has, it seems, taken possession of the young lady, that she would soon die in verification of a remark made by a dying companion some two years since, and, during her sickness, she spoke frequently of death and expected the coming of the grim messenger.
*It's also interesting to note another role Metta played in history. The Philomathean Society, founded at Wesleyan College in 1852, and of which Metta Cubbedge was President for a time, later changed its name to Phi Mu. The sorority is active today with more than 228 chapters and is considered to be the second oldest secret organization for women.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Rocks, Rocks, and More Rocks

Why do people put rocks on grave stones? Some time ago, I learned that the rocks signified a visitor. That is true enough, but I decided to learn a little more about the custom and share my findings with you.

Putting rocks on tombstones is most often described as a Jewish custom. There are many "Ask a Rabbi" columns out there, but I did not find one that knew for sure where the custom originated. They all agreed, however, that a rock symbolized a visitor and when put on a tombstone said, "I remember you." I also read that some people pick up a rock wherever they are when they think of a person that has passed. Then, the next time they visit the grave, they place the rock to say, "I wish you were here."

Rabbi Shraga Simmons offers a deeper meaning: "We are taught that it is an act of ultimate kindness and respect to bury someone and place a marker at the site. After a person is buried, of course, we can no longer participate in burying them. Howe…

Southern Cross of Honor

I'm late to this discussion, but it's one I'd like to join. :-) Terry Thornton at The Graveyard Rabbit of the Hill Country started with Grave Marker Symbols: The Southern Cross of Honor and UCV (link no longer available). Judith Shubert at The Graveyard Rabbit of the Covered Bridges continued with Hood County Texas: C.S.A. Veterans & Southern Cross of Honor Symbol. [UPDATE, 1 June 2009: Judith has moved this post to the blog, Cemeteries with Texas Ties. The link has been corrected to reflect this move. You may also link to her article via her nice comment on this post.]

Wikipedia states:
The Southern Cross of Honor was a military decoration meant to honor the officers, noncommissioned officers, and privates for their valor in the armed forces of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. It was formally approved by the Congress of the Confederate States on October 13, 1862, and was originally intended to be on par with the Union Army's Me…

Thursday Link Love: EyeWitness To History

Yesterday, a link was added to the Genealogy Research Resources Group at Diigo. The link was to the website titled EyeWitness to History.com: History through the eyes of those who lived it. It's a great site, and I encourage all to visit it.

Here are several items I found while snooping around.

- Inside a Nazi Death Camp, 1944: "Hitler established the first concentration camp soon after he came to power in 1933. The system grew to include about 100 camps divided into two types: concentration camps for slave labor in nearby factories and death camps for the systematic extermination of "undesirables" including Jews, Gypsies, homosexuals, the mentally retarded and others."

- Crash of the Hindenburg, 1937: "Radio reporter Herbert Morrison, sent to cover the airship's arrival, watched in horror. His eye witness description of the disaster was the first coast-to-coast radio broadcast and has become a classic piece of audio history." [You can really …


blog.SouthernGraves.net

The hand of the Lord came upon me and brought me out in the Spirit of the Lord, and set me down in the midst of the valley; and it was full of bones. Then He caused me to pass by them all around, and behold, there were very many in the open valley; and indeed they were very dry. And He said to me, "Son of man, can these bones live?"

So I answered, "O Lord God, You know."

Again He said to me, "Prophesy to these bones, and say to them, 'O dry bones, hear the word of the Lord!' Thus says the Lord God to these bones: 'Surely I will cause breath to enter into you, and you shall live...'" (Ezekiel 37:1-5, NKJV)