18 September 2015

Blodgett Cemetery Holds Four Craig Children (This Time It's Personal)

I've been going over my Grandfather's genealogy notes, including a detailed report dated January 1990. I wanted to make sure any information he had that I didn't was noted in my personal research files. As we all well know, revisiting a document will sometimes allow us to see it in a different light. At a different angle. To "see" things we didn't see before.

Such is the case with my great grand aunt Bertha May (Lincecum) Craig. She is on the far right in the picture below.  I didn't realize, or maybe I forgot (to be honest), the amount of loss she suffered in life.


Bertha was born 11 November 1899 to Francis Marion and Annie Victoria (Gibbs) Lincecum. Before she was twenty years old, in 1919, Bertha married Aaron Craig from Kentucky. About sixteen months after their marriage, Bertha gave birth to their first child. A daughter, Lucille, was born 21 October 1920. Bertha and Aaron would go on to produce seven more children, the last being a set of twin boys born February 1937.

The losses began in 1932, when a son named Richard Lee Craig died at the age of just five days. Three years later, Lucille died at the age of 15 years. The year 1937 brought the loss of the twins. Calvan was stillborn. Alvin survived less than nine months.

Adding insult to injury, Bertha lost her husband in 1943, when he was just 46 years old. Bertha was only 43.

Each one of the children's death certificates can be viewed online at Missouri Digital Heritage. Lucille and Alvin died of lobar pneumonia. Richard died of influenza. Each death certificate read the same, burial at Blodgett. This cemetery in Scott County, Missouri holds all four Craig children that did not make it to adulthood.

Individual photos taken by Graver Gal and posted to FindAGrave (2011).
Collage created by S. Lincecum (2015).

11 September 2015

Grandpa and the National War Memorial of Newfoundland

2014 was a bit rough. I lost three grandparents and an uncle. It started in January with the death of my paternal grandmother Betty Sue Campbell Lincecum, and ended in November with the death of her husband (and my paternal grandfather) Billy Joe Lincecum. About March of this year, I was blessed to receive several photo albums, artifacts, and Lincecum genealogy research files. These treasures were most likely put together by Grandpa, and I appreciate my dad and his sister for trusting me with them.


One of the first albums I began to digitize was labeled as " ? - 1954 " and has a Pepperrell A.F.B. cover:


Along with many, many photos of my grandparents, their friends, and my father at just a couple months old, was this image:


Knowing it was likely a memorial of some kind, I thought it would be perfect to write about in this space. A quick Google search revealed this as the National War Memorial of Newfoundland, a post World War I monument built before Newfoundland became a province of Canada. Wikipedia describes the design, in part, this way:
On the west wing, representing the Newfoundlanders who joined the Newfoundland Royal Naval Reserve, is a sailor holding a spyglass. On the east wing, representing the men of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment, is a soldier in full battle gear, loading his rifle, searching the horizon for "the enemy".

Out in front, on the lower pedestal, are fishermen in oilskins and Wellington boots, and a lumberman with his axe slung over his shoulder, symbolizing the Newfoundlanders who served with the Merchant Marine and the Forestry Corps. Over their heads is a granite cross symbolizing the sacred nature of the war memorial. Below, is a bronze plaque stating that the memorial was erected by "a grateful people to honour its war dead".
Here is an image from Wikimedia Commons taken 2008:

Newfoundland National War Memorial

Thanks, Grandpa, for sharing your life and the National War Memorial of Newfoundland in pictures. Miss you and Grandma terribly.


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