21 April 2016

R is for Resolutions on the Death of Little Clyde Harvard

100_1281Resolutions.

Resolutions on the death of little Clyde Harvard.

Whereas our Heavenly Father in all his wise providence, sent his messenger into our midst on August 21, 1900, and bore away the spirit of little Clyde Harvard, who joined the church when eight years old, and has ever since proven that he had given himself to the Lord, by carrying sunshine and happiness into the hearts of others and showing his willingness to do anything for the cause of Christ, be it

Resolved, 1st.  That we the Sunday school of Smyrna church, Snow circuit, have lost one of our most faithful members and sweetest little Christians.

Resolved, 2nd.  That we extend to the bereaved brothers and sister our deepest sympathy and love.

Resolved, 3rd.  That a copy of these resolutions be place upon our minutes, a copy be furnished the Vienna Progress for publication, and a copy sent to the family.

HUGH HARVARD,
W. J. VINSON,
WINNIE DAVIES,
Committee.

[Vienna Progress (Georgia). 18 October 1900, pg. 3, col. 1]

According to FindAGrave.com, Clyde's parents were Mary J. and Joseph J. P. Harvard.  Joseph married Mary J. Paul 8 December 1870 at Dooly County, Georgia.  Mary and Joseph are side by side, to the left of Clyde (who was an orphan for the five months before his death) at Harmony-Smyrna Cemetery.

Harmony - Smyrna Cemetery

Furthermore, I found Joseph's Civil War Service Record at Fold3.  He enlisted early in 1861 and served with Company I of the 18th Georgia Infantry.  Joseph's time in the Confederate States Army had to have been miserable.  In December 1862 at Fredericksburg, Virginia, he was "wounded seriously." Pvt. Harvard was also in and out of Virginia hospitals for much of the war, but it appears he always returned to his duty.  "Chron. Hepatitis," bronchitis, chronic pneumonia, enlargement of the liver, diarrhea, and "tendency to consumption" were some of the diagnoses.  And finally, Pvt. Joseph P. Harvard was taken Prisoner of War 19 October 1864 and was sent to Point Lookout, Maryland.  He was released 28 June 1865.

I have to wonder if those very rough four years shortened Joseph's life.  He died 5 March 1900 at the fairly young age of 55 years.

[If you're wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts:  I am attempting to follow the Blogging from A to Z Challenge(links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off. Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). Oh, and wish me luck!]

1 comment:

Darla M Sands said...

This post makes me so grateful to live in a peaceful place, if not time. But mankind seems to thrive on war. ~sigh~ I hope you are having a lovely day. I'm enjoying all the birds looking for mates this spring while seated on my back porch. Even the woodpeckers are hammering out a love song!
Awakening Dreams and Conquering Nightmares with a Pen
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