26 April 2017

V is for Veiled in Mystery: James Mooney Killed in the Line of Duty (A-Z)

Someone got away with murder.

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Rome Tri-Weekly Courier (Georgia)
21 April 1874 -- pg. 3

THE BLUDGEON.

THE MYSTERIOUS KILLING OF POLICEMAN MOONEY.

…Rome has been thrown into much excitement in consequence of the mysterious taking off of Policeman Mooney, an officer of quiet and orderly habits, faithful in the discharge of his duties, and known as a reliable man and a good citizen.  The circumstances of his death are still veiled in mystery, the Coroner's inquest having developed no clue as to how and by whom the deceased came to his death.  It seems to be one of those well-laid plans of crime which leave no trace of the perpetrator or perpetrators.  So far the Coroner and his jury have been unable to unravel the mystery or to get on track of any information that promises to lead to the development of the crime.

Mooney's body was discovered late one Saturday night "along the track of the Rome Railroad, at the foot of Etowah street, almost directly upon the bank of the Etowah river, and but a short distance from the site of the steam mills of C. E. Hills & Co., recently burned."

CHARACTER OF THE WOUNDS.
Upon investigation it was discovered that the deceased had received a heavy blow behind the left ear, crushing the skull, and another across the left side of the head above the the [sic] ear, and rather to the posterior of the head. Both of these blows seemed to have been inflicted with a club, or a heavy, blunt instrument in the shape of a bludgeon, and either one were calculated to produce death...

It seems to have been a surprise attack, as there were no signs of a struggle.  The Coroner's Inquest, held "the whole of Sunday," found nothing that pointed "to the party who committed the deed."

WIFE AND CHILD BEREAVED.
Policeman Mooney leaves a wife and child who were entirely dependent on him for support…

The mayor of the city offered a $250 reward for information leading to the arrest of the murderer or murderers of Policeman Mooney, but the Coroner and his jury remained clueless.

Less than two months later, James Peter Mooney's whistle was found.  Following also from the Rome Tri-Weekly Courier, dated 9 June 1874:

We understand that the parties engaged in putting up the new telegraph poles through the city, found Policeman Mooney's whistle at or near the junction of the railroads in the upper part of the city.  The question is, Died he lose it there in the struggle for life, or did the murderers throw it away or lose it in that part of the city after committing the deed?

More than another month goes by, and still nothing.  The last I found from 1874 follows.

Rome Tri-Weekly Courier (Georgia)
14 July 1874 -- pg. 3

FLOYD SUPERIOR COURT.

The Grand Jury Presentments for the First Week.

We have instituted as rigid and thorough an investigation as it was in our power to do, in relation to the brutal assassination of Policeman Mooney in the city of Rome in April last; but after an exhaustive effort on our part we regret to say that our labors, like those of the Coroner's Jury, to discover the fiendish perpetrators of the diabolical outrage have been unsuccessful.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

25 April 2017

Under the Urn Rest the Shorters (A to Z Challenge, Tombstone Tuesday)

The remains of Alfred and Martha B. Shorter rest at Myrtle Hill Cemetery in Rome, Floyd County, Georgia under a remarkably clean tombstone topped with a draped urn.  Martha was born 25 January 1799, and died 22 March 1877.  When her funeral services were conducted at the Baptist Church, it was said by the Rome Weekly Courier to be the largest congregation "ever known to have assembled on a week day."

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Alfred, born 23 November 1803, lived five more years without Martha.  His obituary ran in the 20 July 1882 Cedartown Advertiser:

Death of Col. Shorter of Rome.
On Tuesday at 2 P. M. Col. Alfred Shorter in his 79th year died at his home surrounded by his friends and kindred.  For more than a year his physical strength has been failing and by degrees death took possession of his frame, the vital flame burned itself away and his noble form was left cold and pulseless.  His biography would be the history of Rome, for forty years he has lived among his people, been identified with her interests, took part in the great transactions that concerned the welfare of the community and by his kindness, honesty and energy endeared himself to all her people.  He became immensely rich.  He used his money for the public good.  The Shorter College which he has just completed will stand as a monument to his memory to all coming generations.

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Alfred Shorter continued to give to the Shorter College even after his death.  His will was printed in the local newspaper.  It provided -

To Shorter College, $23,000 Rome water-works bonds; $7,000 Rome bonds; 100 shares Rome railroad stock.  And it is my will that the corpus of said property as above mentioned be regarded as sacred and for ever be set apart as a permanent endowment of said college, the interest or income from said bonds or stock to be used in the employment of teachers, in reduction of tuition, in giving assistance to poor but worthy students, keeping up repairs or in any other way the trustees in their judgement think will best advance the interest of said college.

To Shorter College $5,000 for additional apparatus, furniture and improvement of grounds, under direction of the president.

shorter-bw


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

24 April 2017

T is for Thomas James Berry, a Soldier & a Man (A to Z Challenge)

Standing proud and tall, with a laurel wreath – a symbol of victory over death – draped over it's top, is a monument to the career soldier Thomas James Berry.  The four sides and panels tell the story of his supreme sacrifice in body and a life cut short.

Girls Day Oct 2014-003

In Memory of
Thomas James Berry
Born October 28, 1835
Who Died At Newnan, The Place Of His Birth, The 16th Day Of October A.D. 1865.

A Graduate Of The United States Military Academy At West Point, N.Y. Class Of 1857.
He Served As Lieutenant Of Dragoons In The U.S. Army Till 1861.
A Soldier In The Southern Army He Was Wounded In Seven Battles.

No Country E'er Had A Truer Son --
No Cause A Nobler Champion;
No People A Braver Defender,
Than The Dead Soldier Who Sleeps Here!

A Man Tried,
In Many High Offices And Critical Enterprises;
And Found Faithful In All.
In His Honor Impregnable;
In His Simplicity Sublime.

An Obituary from 21 October 1865 edition of Newnan Herald (Georgia):

DIED,

At the family residence in this place, on Monday, the 16th inst., Colonel THOMAS J. BERRY, in the 30th year of his age, son of Hon. A. J. Berry, and late of the 60th Regt. Ga. Vols., Army of Virginia.

Col. Berry graduated at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, in the Class of 1857, was commissioned Lieutenant in the 2d Dragoons, U.S. Army, with which he served in the Utah campaign, and against the Indians in Oregon and California till the secession of Georgia, January 19th, 1861, when he resigned his commission in the Federal Army and tendered his services in defence of his native South.

Ever at his post, from the siege of Fort Pickens to the close of the war, he participated in the severe battles in front of Richmond, at the second Manassa [sic], and in the Valley, receiving five wounds, by which his manly form was exhausted.

He will be remembered long by his numerous friends and acquaintances as a genial companion, a talented scholar, a courteous and polite gentleman, and by the gallant veterans of the Virginia Army as a brave and true soldier.

The remains of Thomas James Berry rest at Oak Hill Cemetery at Newnan, Coweta County, Georgia.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

22 April 2017

S is for the State Seal of Georgia on Tom Owen's Tombstone (A to Z)

An arch which bears the word Constitution is over three pillars, representing the three branches of government, on the State Seal of Georgia.  Banners around each pillar contain the words Wisdom, Justice, and Moderation – Georgia's official motto.  Here is the simplified version of this seal on Captain Tom Owen's tombstone.

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Capt. Tom Musgrove Owen was born in Coweta County, Georgia 10 October 1834.  He enlisted in the 4th Texas Regiment, C.S.A. 7 May 1861 at Grimes County, Texas.  His service proved fatal when little over a year later the captain received a gunshot wound in the Battle of Gaines Mill (noted as "farm" on his tombstone) near Richmond, Virginia.  Capt. Owen died as a result 3 August 1862 at Richmond.

100_5635The following is from Sid Johnson's Texans Who Wore the Gray as transcribed and shared by James Douglas here:

Just before we were ordered into line of battle, and while heavy firing could be heard in our front and on each flank, Captain Owens of our regiment, was talking to some comrades of the battle in which we expected soon to be engaged, and drawing his sword and waiving it over his head, repeated the following lines from Scott's "Marmion" [an epic poem about the 1513 Battle of Flodden]:

The war that for a space did fail
Now, trebly thundering, swelled the gale,
And "Stanley!" was the cry;
A light on Marmion's visage spread
And fired his glazing eye;
With dying hand above his head,
He shook the fragment of his blade
And shouted "Victory!"
"Charge, Chester, charge! On, Stanley, on!"
Were the last words of Marmion.

While they were the last words of Marmion, they were almost the last words of Gallant Owens, who fell mortally wounded in less than half an hour from the time he quoted them with such prophetic inspiration.

On the back of Capt. Owen's tombstone at Oak Hill Cemetery in Newnan, Georgia is an intricate carving of two crossed swords:

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A signature of the stone carver is located on the bottom right corner of the stone.  Michael Muldoon of M. Muldoon & Co. was a reputable and talented carver.  This stone was possibly made out of Italian marble, as I believe was often Mr. Muldoon's base before sculpture.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

21 April 2017

R is for Resting in Hope of a Glorious Resurrection (A to Z Challenge)

Husband and wife (and father and mother) Shadrach Ware and Clarissa Shine rest together at Marshallville City Cemetery in Macon County, Georgia.

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Father and Mother

Shadrach Ware
Feb 17, 1808
Sept 1, 1873

Clarissa
Wife of S. Ware
Feb 18, 1820
Aug 3, 1880

Resting in Hope of a Glorious Resurrection

Something extra-special about the Ware's elaborate tombstone is all the symbolism. Sitting on top is a floriated cross and anchor.  A floriated cross bears arms with three "projections" on the ends, representing the Trinity.  The anchor is a symbol of hope.

cross-anchor

Next is wheat.  It could represent a long and fruitful life, as well as immortality and resurrection.  Wheat is also a popular Masonic symbol.

wheat

Lastly, we have an urn and flame.  This could represent eternal life of the soul.

urn-flame

Other symbols on the stone (not pictured) include a fern and lily.  The fern represents humility and sincerity.  The lily represents purity, and the casting off of earthly things.

This is a wonderfully intricate stone that gives the passer-by a lot to ponder.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

20 April 2017

Q is for the Quigg Family & a Son's Supreme Sacrifice (A to Z Challenge)

What else could I do for the letter Q, but introduce you to the Quigg family.  Three members rest at Myrtle Hill Cemetery in Rome, Floyd County, Georgia – father, mother, and son.

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I like the sentiment here – Ever she looked for good, ever she found it.

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Always Faithful, Mr. Quigg.  I thank you for your service.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

19 April 2017

P is for the Prominent Minister of Newnan Who Passed Away: J. H. Hall

100_5599Rev. James Hamilton Hall, a Doctor of Divinity, was born 16 April 1836 in Greenville, Meriwether County, Georgia to Alexander and Elizabeth "Betsy" Brown Hall.  James's grandfather was the Irish born Hugh Hall.

Alexander was in a position of "financial ease," and thus provided his son James with the "best educational advantages." Yet in a biography of the good reverend, published 1912 in Men of Mark in Georgia, it was written that James led "an aimless and dissipated life."

The young man arrived at manhood and became, through a certain philosophic trend of mind, imbedded in the meshes of unbelief.  He even went so far as for a time to lead an aimless and dissipated life.  He had one strong anchor in the shape of the young lady to whom he was engaged, Miss Sarah E. Hall, of Greene county.  She was a woman of strong Christian character, and while she positively refused to marry him during this period of his life, she yet did not let him entirely go, and her influence, combined with that of other friends finally induced in him a season of serious thought.

Eventually, young James "threw off the shackles of unbelief and took up the cross of Christian duty." He got the girl, too.  Sarah became Mrs. J. H. Hall about November 1859.  The biographer continues:

In May, 1860, he was baptized into the Bethlehem Church, of Coweta county.  In August, 1861, he was ordained to the Baptist ministry at the meeting of the Western Association.  His first work was as pastor of the church at Franklin, Heard county.  Later he served the Providence, Mt. Lebanon, and Greenville churches in Meriwether county.  From these he came back to his home county and ministered to Bethlehem, Mt. Labanon and White Oak Grove churches in Coweta county and Bethel church in Heard county.  From the pastorate of these he was called in 1869 to the Newnan church, where he concluded his life service in a pastorate of over thirty years.

Rev. Hall and Sarah had eight children.  Only four survived him.  One of them, a son named Hewlett, was also well known in Newnan and throughout Georgia.

James Hamilton Hall died in Newnan 18 July 1903, "after more than forty years of untiring labor in the cause of the Master." From the 19 July 1903 edition of the Columbus Daily Enquirer (Georgia), via GenealogyBank:

REV. J. H. HALL DEAD.

Prominent Minister of Newnan Passes Away.
Newnan, Ga, July 18. – Rev. James H. Hall, D. D., pastor of the Central Baptist church of this city, and one of the most profound pulpit orators of the State, died this morning at 2 o'clock after a very short illness.

Only last week he was active in revival at his church, during which he was taken with dysentery, the attack of which physicians could not stay.  He was born in 1837 [sic], and began active ministry in 1860, and in 1870 was called to the church at this place, which he actively and incessantly served.  Possibly no man in the country was more universally loved and whose death will be more deplored.

He leaves and wife and several children, among whom is Hon. Hewitt [sic] A. Hall.

The funeral will be conducted by Rev. Vaughn, of LaGrange, and Rev. V. A. Ham, of this city, tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock, from the Central Baptist church.

The remains of Rev. James Hamilton Hall rest in the family burial lot at Oak Hill Cemetery in Newnan.

"I shall be satisfied when I awake in thy likeness."


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

18 April 2017

O is for the Originator of the Georgia Peach Industry, Samuel Rumph (A-Z)

Question:  "What's the top fruit crop in the state of Georgia?"

Answer:  "Blueberries."

Is that not what you were expecting? It's really a relatively recent development.  In the last dozen years, blueberries have bested peaches as the top fruit crop in Georgia.  But that in no way diminishes the impact the humble peach had (and still has) on this state.

100_5719Georgia earned it's "Peach State" nickname in the decades following the Civil War, when annual production expanded to reach a height of about 8 million bushels by 1928.  One of the people we have to thank for that is Samuel Rumph:

Samuel Henry Rumph, a middle Georgia peach grower during the late 1800’s, is credited with being the “Father of the Georgia Peach industry” as he revolutionized the industry with a new variety which he named after his wife Elberta. This yellow-fleshed peach was of superior quality and shipped better than previous varieties. Not only did he breed this superior variety but he also invented a way to ice train cars loaded with peaches, thus getting this "Queen of Fruits" into the populous Northeast.  Rumph never patented his Elberta peach or the refrigerated train car. Instead he opted to share this windfall with his neighbors and the "Georgia Peach Boom" began. – Georgia Peach Council

Mr. Rumph died 22 December 1922, and as you might imagine, papers across the state of Georgia carried the news.  Here is one such article from the Columbus Ledger, dated the day of Samuel's death [via GenealogyBank]:

Originator of Georgia Peach Industry Dead
Marshallville, Ga., Dec. 22. – Samuel H. Rumph, 70, known in this section as the father and originator of the peach industry, died at 3 o'clock this morning at his home here.

Mr. Rumph suffered a stroke early yesterday and members of his family were summoned to his bedside.

He was the propagator of the famous Elberta and George Belle peaches.  The Elberta was named after his first wife.  Mr. Rumph was the first man to ship a crate of peaches out of Georgia.

Practically all of Mr. Rumph's life was devoted to agriculture.  When he first grew peaches for commercial purposes and announced that he intended to ship peaches out of the state, he received little encouragement and many who heard of his pro[s]pect regarded it with skepticism.

From the shipping of the first crate of peaches by Mr. Rumph the fruit industry began to grow and today in middle Georgia is second to cotton in importance.

Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at 10:30 at Marshallville.

The remains of Samuel Henry Rumph rest at Marshallville Cemetery in Macon County, Georgia.  His fine tombstone is located between those of two important women in his life:  his mother Caroline, and his first wife Clara Elberta.

Marshallville Cemetery - Fair Harbor


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

17 April 2017

N is for Nunc Requievit in Patris Domo (A to Z Challenge, Today's Epitaph)

Standing in Myrtle Hill Cemetery at Rome, Georgia is an obelisk placed for Dr. Eben Hillyer, his wife Georgia E. (Cooley) Hillyer, and their daughter Ethel Hillyer Harris Brown.

I'd like to share the Latin phrase that is part of the epitaph for Eben.

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"Nunc requievit in Patris domo" translates to English as "Now rests in his Father's house."

(If you're like me, and don't know Roman Numerals past X=10, Eben was born 12th August 1832, and died 20th December 1910.)

100_6828An obituary for Dr. Eben Hillyer from the 24th December 1910 edition of Georgia's Augusta Chronicle follows [via GenealogyBank]:

DR. EBEN HILLYER DIED IN ROME, GA.

Brother of Mr. Carlton Hillyer, of Augusta, Passed Away Tuesday Night – Was of Old Southern Family.

Dr. Eben Hillyer, of Rome, Ga., died at his home Tuesday evening at 6 o'clock.

The immediate cause of Dr. Hillyer's death was hypostatic pneumonia, following a fracture of the right thigh, sustained less than a week before.

The funeral services were held in Rome Thursday morning at 11 o'clock.

Dr. Hillyer was a brother of Mr. Carlton Hillyer, of Augusta.  He was also a brother of Judge George Hillyer, of Atlanta; Mr. Henry Hillyer, of Atlanta; Mrs. Mary Whitfield, Miss Kate Hillyer and Miss Eva Hillyer, of Decatur, Ga., and Mrs. Ethel Hillyer Harris, Dr. Hillyer's only living child.

In speaking of Dr. Hillyer's life, The Rome Tribune-Herald says:

Dr. Hillyer was born in Athens, Clarke county, on August 12, 1832.  He was a son of Junius and Jane Hillyer.  All of Dr. Hillyer's great-grandfathers were Revolutionary soldiers, and George Walton, a great-uncle, was one of the signers of the declaration of independence, while another greatuncle [sic], Peter Early, was governor of Georgia during the war of 1812.  His father, Junius Hillyer, was a man of great distinction in his day and honored the state by distinguished service.  He served on the superior court bench, was a member of congress two terms, and was solicitor of the United States treasury under Buchanan.

Dr. Eben Hillyer received his preliminary education in Athens and Penfield, Ga., and was graduated from Jefferson Medical college, of Philadelphia, in the class of 1854.  When the Civil war came on, Dr. Hillyer promptly entered the Confederate service, becoming a surgeon with the rank of major.  He gave four years of his life to this work, and became one of the best known surgeons in the entire Southern service.

After the close of the war, Dr. Hillyer resumed the active practice of his profession in Atlanta, where for a number of years he served as a professor of institutes of medicines in the old Atlanta Medical college.  In 1867 he returned to Rome, where, he engaged in the practice of his profession and also identified himself with agricultural interests.

In 1875, Dr. Hillyer was made president of the Rome railroad, which position he retained for 13 years, and in connection with which he was identified with the executive control of other roads to which the Rome line was attached or with which it was affiliated.

Several years ago, Dr. Hillyer retired from active business and professional activity, and lived more or less at his ease.  He never held political office, persistently refusing to permit the use of his name in that connection.  He was an earnest and consistent member of the First Baptist church of Rome, and always gave it his loyal support in all of its endeavors.

On July 29, 1857, Dr. Hillyer was married to Miss Georgia E. Cooley, of Rome, an acknowledged beauty and belle in her day.  She was the daughter of Hollis Cooley, one of Rome's best known citizens at the time.  This union proved to be a very happy one, indeed; Dr. Hillyer was deeply devoted to his home circle and his family.

Born of Cavalier stock, a gentleman of the old school, a staunch friend in time of sorrow no less than in time of sunshine and joy, Dr. Hillyer has gone to his reward beyond the stars.  Rome will mourn his loss, and mark his passing with a sigh of sincere grief.

Dr. Hillyer was a magnetic and accomplished gentleman, a Roman of whom the entire city was proud and whom it delighted to honor.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

15 April 2017

Meet Mary Lee (A to Z Challenge, Letter M)

This is Mary Lee Renfus.  Isn't she the cutest?

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Census records suggest Mary was born in Georgia.  Her granite tombstone provides the year of 1895.  About or before 1916, Mary Lee married a farmer named James Renfus.  They had at least six children.  In the Spring of 1935, Mary and James were living in Dooly County, Georgia.  Five years later, they were in Peach County.

Mary lost James in December of 1960.

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According to the Social Security Death Index, Mary died in Bibb County, Georgia at the age of 90 years.  Her remains were returned to Dooly County and now rest beside those of her husband at Evergreen Cemetery in Pinehurst.

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Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

14 April 2017

L is for Lydia. Her End of Life was Like the Close of a Summer Day. (A–Z)

Such a Death is Like the Close
of a Summer Day,
Mellow and Peaceful
the Heart Though in Tears
Utters No Protest and Says
"All is Well"

100_5654I think you can see in the shadow-laden image at right, the tombstone (in the style of a ledger marker) for Lydia Beavers is quite unremarkable.  The words engraved, and repeated above, are what struck me so.  The rest of Lydia's epitaph and obituary follow, providing a small glimpse into her life story.

Sacred to the Memory of
Lydia Reid Beavers -
Born in Greene County, Georgia 2 May 1802. The Daughter of Henry Martin Reid and Edith Harrison. Married James Beavers in 1818 in Greene County, Georgia. They had Thirteen Children. He was Born in Georgia 14 September 1797, Died in Coweta County, Georgia 26 November 1842. Buried in Unmarked Grave [at] Welcome Community, West of Newnan. She Departed this Life 24 June 1890 After a Long Pilgrimage of 88 Years.

Since Lydia's stone is a relatively new one, I think it's interesting the similarity between the epitaph and obituary.  Furthermore, the end of her obituary relays a legacy wider than I would have ever imagined.

Herald and Advertiser (Newnan, Georgia)
1 August 1890, pg. 7

In Memory of Mrs. Lydia Beavers.
When the full measure of one's years has been attained, it is time to die.  The weary, worn form needs rest.  It is best that it should fall asleep, if it be in hope of a bright and eternal morrow.  Such a death is like the close of a summer day – mellow and peaceful.  Against it the heart, though in tears, utters no protest.  It says, "It is well."

On June 24th, 1890, a "mother in Israel," sister Lydia Beavers, passed from earthly service to her heavenly rest.

She was born May 2d, 1802.  A long pilgrimage is 88 years! She was married to James Beavers in 1818.

Sister Beavers had been a member of the Baptist church for 72 years.  Few are permitted to witness so long for Christ on earth.  "Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord."

Deceased leaves 11 children, 90 grandchildren, 105 great-grandchildren, and 10 great-great-grandchildren.  Of these 216 are living.
H.
Newnan, Ga., July 30th, 1890.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

13 April 2017

Killed in Argonne Battle, France (A to Z Challenge, Letter K)

In the Confederate / Military section of Oak Hill Cemetery at Newnan, Coweta County, Georgia is a stone laid for Charlton Samuel Leach, killed in action during World War I.

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Based on the dates on his tombstone, Charlton was killed three weeks before his 25th birthday.  What is even more heartbreaking, in my opinion, is Charlton was killed just one week before the armistice.

Approximately a month after his death, Charlton's parents received a telegram from the War Department.

Newnan Herald (Georgia)
6 December 1918, pg. 11

Mr. and Mrs. J. Clayton Leach received a telegram from the War Department yesterday announcing the death of their son, Private Charlton S. Leach, more familiarly known among his friends as "Buddie." He was killed in action on Nov. 4, the report said.  Private Leach went with the second contingent from Coweta to Camp Gordon in September of last year, and had been in France for several months, being attached to Co. M, 164th Infantry.  He was a splendid young man, and news of his death was learned with deep regret by his many friends here.

Coming across tombstones such as this in a cemetery, it's not always clear whether or not they truly stand over buried remains.  An interesting article at HistoryNet tackled the topic of bringing war dead home for burial:

Within the United States, powerful figures…organized to argue that burying servicemen at the battlefield with their fallen comrades offered the greatest glory. Former president Theodore Roosevelt spoke to this when his son Quentin, an American pilot, was shot down over France in July 1918, then laid to rest with full military honors by German troops. Roosevelt and his wife, Edith, objected when told their son’s remains would be brought home.

“To us it is painful and harrowing long after death to move the poor body from which the soul has fled,” he wrote. “We greatly prefer that Quentin shall continue to lie on the spot where he fell in battle and where the foeman buried him.”

Standing against all this logic and power were thousands of Americans who demanded that the government bring home their dead. They contended that the government had to do what it had done in wars before. One mother from Brooklyn wrote: “My son sacrificed his life to America’s call, and now you must as a duty of yours bring my son back to me.”

I did come across another article in the Atlanta Constitution (Georgia) dated 9 May 1919, that may shed light on the decision.  Article was titled, "166 WOUNDED MEN, GEORGIANS, ARRIVE."

Word has been received in Atlanta of the safe arrival in New York harbor of 166 more Georgia men, whose names have previously appeared in the official casualties list.  The names of the wounded Georgians…are as follows:

…Charlton Samuel Leach, Newnan;… 


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

12 April 2017

J is for James B. Artope: Marble Cutter & Stone Mason (A to Z Challenge)

This tombstone has been standing at Marshallville City Cemetery for so long a tree has grown up around a portion of it.  Elizabeth Rembert died 5th January 1837, at the age of 51 years – 180 years ago.

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But what I really want to share with you is the signature in the bottom right corner of the stone:  J. Artope.

jartopesig

James B. Artope was the name of a marble cutter and stone mason from Macon, GA, located about 35 miles from Marshallville.  He was born 4 December 1809 in Charleston, South Carolina.  I know James came to Macon by the taking of the 1840 census, and the stone above puts him there even a few years earlier.  Every census record from 1850 to 1880 shows James working in the marble industry.  The following is a collage of snippets from the 1860, 1870, and 1880 records.

Rose Hill Blog Data-001

James died 13 December 1883, and was buried at Rose Hill Cemetery in Macon.  He easily made tombstones for his fellow Georgians for well over thirty years.  James also passed the skill onto others with an apprenticeship program, and his son Thomas followed in his footsteps.

When walking through cemeteries in the middle Georgia area, if you look closely, you are sure to come across the signature of J. B. Artope.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

11 April 2017

It is Well with Thomas, for He is Now an Angel (A to Z Challenge, Letter I & Tombstone Tuesday)

Remember Hibernia Berry from yesterday's post? This is the son she buried just fifteen months before her own sad demise.

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"It is well with him, for he is now an angel."

Thomas Joel
Infant son of William B. & Hibernia L. Berry
Born Jan 8, 1870
Died July 13, 1870

"Our God in Heaven, from that holy place,
To each of us an angel guide has given.
But parents of dead children have more grace,
For they give angels to their God and Heaven."

Oak Hill Cemetery
Newnan, Coweta County, Georgia

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Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

10 April 2017

H is for Hibernia Berry. She had Beauty and Wit. (A to Z, Today's Epitaph)

100_5638This towering memorial at Oak Hill Cemetery in Newnan, Georgia has been chronicled on many a website.  Nonetheless, I could not bear to omit it here.  A woman in deep contemplation sits on high, possibly wondering why she had to leave her husband and young children alone so soon.

Hibernia was born at Newnan 20 November 1837.  Her parents were John and Nancy O. Dougherty.  John was a tavern keeper, born about 1794 in Ireland.

Before she was 24 years old, Hibernia would marry William Bird Berry.  He served as mayor of Newnan for several years.

The couple had four children:  Andrew, John, Olive, and Thomas.  Less than two years after giving birth to Thomas, Hibernia was dead, aged just 33 years.

A portion of the epitaph on Hibernia's tombstone reads as follows:

She had Beauty and Wit, without Vanity or Vice.

100_5639


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

08 April 2017

Gather Ye Rosebuds While Ye May (A to Z Challenge, Letter G)


Gather ye rosebuds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
To-morrow will be dying.

(17th century poet Robert Herrick)


Small buds are often used to represent the death of a child.  A tender start to life cut down before it really begins.  But the stanza above shows that a rosebud also symbolizes simply the passage of time.  So this display on the tombstone placed for 84-year-old Elizabeth Cole is really not out of place.

Girls Day Oct 2014-002

Elizabeth, according to FindAGrave, was the daughter of Anderson Fambrough.  She died 12th August 1863.  Her remains rest next to those of her husband in Oak Hill Cemetery at Newnan, Coweta County, Georgia.

Robert Cole was a veteran of the War of 1812, and the 1850 U.S. Federal Census shows he held the occupation of "Cooper" two years before his death.  A cooper is a maker or repairer of casks and barrels.

Girls Day Oct 2014-001


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order). This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.  You may follow along with me by email and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  I am also participating with Lincecum Lineage.  Though it is a one name study blog, my theme there is "kinfolk direct." These genealogy and family history posts all involve a direct relative.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

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